My First Triathlon and What I Want to Remember

IMG_9557I did it. My first triathlon. It was “only” a sprint length, so 1/3 mile swim, 8 mile bike, and 3.1 mile run, but it was a HUGE hurdle for me to face mentally, considering I was and AM only comfortable in 1 of the 3 disciplines. And I only trained for 4 weeks (see my previous post Triathlon 101 – Step One: Commit). And I got a head cold 3 days beforehand, and a migraine the day before (and still have one). And I taught a cardio dance class at 7:30pm the night before.

Beginner poor planning problems.

But I did it.

And for the first time in a long time, I am really proud of myself. I did something… for ME. Something really really scary… TO me.

I want to remember this moment.

I want to remember the BEFORE: that I cried every week for the past month.  I want to remember the DURING: what a panic attack feels like.  I want to remember the AFTER: what a high it is to make it across the finish line, and that high is still going!

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BEFORE: I cried every week for the 4 weeks leading up to the race.

Week One: Crying at the Pool

On my second day of swim training, I had to bring my 7-year-old daughter with me to the pool. I gave her some dive toys and told her she could just play while I swam. And I told her I was going to swim 33 laps non stop.

Well, we got in the pool, and I went off. I did TWO laps. I stopped next to her, and I was on the verge of tears because I couldn’t keep my breath calm enough to continue. I was so disappointed and so upset at myself for not being able to do the 33 laps nonstop like I set out to do. Two. I did only two laps nonstop.

I looked at my daughter and said, “Mama can’t do it. I can’t do it.” I pretty much gave up on the triathlon at that moment.

“Yes you can Mama! You can do it!” she shouted to my surprise.

I had given up but my daughter had not. She gave me that extra push of hope and inspiration to try again. I gave her a big hug and told her, “Thank you cutie.” And I started swimming again, with a new refreshed determination. This time I did it. 33 laps nonstop.

She probably does not even remember this moment, but I will forever. She believed in me.

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Week Two: Crying at the Stoplight

I bought a starter bike three weeks before the race – my first bike since I was 12 years old.  Needless to say, it was my first time wearing cycling shoes and using clip on pedals, and figuring out how to use gears.  On my first real ride, I did a 17 mile loop where the race was going to take place.  It was a great opportunity to check out the terrain, and practice how to shift gears.  Everything was going great.

On my way home in the final few miles, I had to make a left turn at the stoplight.  It was tricky to lift up my left hand and merge to the left turn lane.  That already made me nervous.  But I made it to the lane and unclipped my right foot, ready to stop.  Unfortunately, my weight was shifted to the left, and… because my left foot was still clipped in, I completely fell over like a tree being chopped down.  With cars lined up behind me.  Shocked and embarrassed, I picked myself up, half laughing half crying.  When the light turned green, I didn’t even attempt to get on the bike.  I ran on the crosswalk pushing my bike along – avoiding all eye contact with the drivers around me.

Then I did it again a few stoplights later.  Unclipped my right foot, fell to my left.  Again.  It’s mortifying.

Week Three: Crying at my Dance Class

Two weeks to go and I got most of my gear at this point, including my new Synergy wetsuit, Orca thermal swim cap and Mack ear plugs.  My friend Lizzy and I decided we should do a test triathlon at the actual race site so we could swim in open water for the first time, and see how the bike and run felt afterwards.

I was so nervous that morning packing my car with all the gear I needed for swimming, biking, and running.  I had stomach problems.  I had to pee all the time.  My heart was racing.  I couldn’t focus.

Oh, and I had to teach my dance class first.

Well, I showed up at the dance class, trying to keep my mind focused on what I was going to teach.  But then I made eye contact with Lizzy, and at that exact moment, we both lost it.  I burst into tears because my nerves were out of control.  We wanted to do this test run, but we didn’t too.  I had to share with my dance students what was going on with me because I was a wreck.

Week Four: Crying at my Yoga Class

My theme for my yoga classes this week was “Overcoming Your Fear.”  I taught a wall class on handstands and inversions for my power yoga class.  I found quotes about facing your fears.  I made playlists with songs about confidence and bravery.  I shared honestly about my triathlon and my fears of swimming, or drowning, or simply failing.  And in my last yoga class before the race, I realized that I couldn’t just share about my fears anymore, I was really going to have to face my fears.  Very very very soon.  And yup, you guessed it, tears.

Looking back, I was anxious the entire month before the triathlon.  Some days were just worse than others, but I was constantly anxious.  I don’t cry often.  Maybe in some movies, or once or twice a year… but this month, once a week.  And now I know when I am truly scared, that translates into crying.

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DURING: The panic attack while swimming is REAL.

I want to remember that the swim portion was just as terrifying as I had imagined.  I started the first 100 meters of the swim probably way too fast for my pace, and at the first buoy turn, it got way too crowded. Someone grabbed my leg. There was splashing everywhere. I panicked and just treaded water waiting for the crowds to pass. But then I couldn’t calm down. I was gasping for breath. I refused to put my head in the water. This next 200 meter section was an ugly mix of breaststroke, sidestroke, backstroke, freestyle with my head out of the water, treading water, and doggy paddling. Yes, doggy paddling. I really didn’t think I could keep going. I couldn’t breathe. I wanted to climb onto the kayaks and give up. I told myself I’d never do this again. I told myself I couldn’t do it. I hated that moment.

Then I turned the final buoy (still doggy paddling) and remembered my swim experience with my daughter 4 weeks ago.  I didn’t want to fail my kids, who were watching me swim and cheering me on.  I couldn’t give up.  And I didn’t want to doggy paddle to the swim finish line.  So somehow that mental switch composed me and I was able to catch my breath.  I told myself to finish slow and steady the final 200 meters just like I have been training. I swam freestyle the final third, simply motivated by the fact that I was so close to getting out of the water.  I was calm and happy getting out of the water.

But those few minutes in the middle were seriously MISERABLE.  Panic attacks are no joke.  A few minutes felt like eternity.

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AFTER: Believe in yourself.

After the slowest swim ever, I made up a lot of lost time on the bike ride. Somehow I relied on my strength and muscles and just went for it. As fast as I could. And I LOVED it. Surprisingly, the bike ride was my favorite part by far and I had a huge smile on my face the entire ride.

The run was consistent and steady as expected.  I was surprised I held an 8 minute pace even though it felt like a 10 minute pace.

My finish time was 1:08:03 and what in the world? I was 54th overall and got 3rd place in my age group (females 35-39)!!! I seriously was just trying not to be last! I left before the awards ceremony but for sure that would have been my first podium!  HA!  Now THAT was unexpected.

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I want to remember all of this while it is fresh.

My highs.  My lows.  My super highs.  My super lows.

Wow, what an experience.  WHAT. AN. EXPERIENCE.

Now the question is… do I keep training and try it again???  Can I compete my best effort next time versus having a panic attack?  Or was the swim that terrifying that I don’t want to put myself through that again?  Or should I just go back to my handstands?

Or both?  =)

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Thank you thank you to all of you who have read my post to here… who have silently cheered me on this past month.  Thank you for believing in me.

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10 Tips For Migraine Relief


So you suffer from migraines too?

I’m sorry… I understand.  I really do.  And for the first time in probably 25 years, I’ve finally figured out how to find *some* relief.  Some.  And if you truly get migraines, you are like me and desperate for ANY relief.  So read on…

I started getting them in my teens, about every 6 weeks, and consistently for 3 days each time.  For 24 years.  Yes the dark room, yes nausea and throwing up, yes please crush my head with some metal plates.

Not my finest moment, but I documented my last migraine attack:

 


Just like everyone’s symptoms and frequencies are different, relief comes in different combinations.

Combinations.  There is not one thing to relieve migraines.  It’s a lot of factors.  I am convinced I get them because my personality is go go GO, so much that I am anxious and stressed all the time, not sleeping enough, not eating regularly, saying yes to everything and then the migraines hit because it is the ONLY way I become forced to do absolutely nothing for 3 days.  Well, I do the bare minimum like go to work still and finish my responsibilities (while literally dying inside), then running home and crashing on the bed not because it makes me feel better but because I  just need to close my eyes and dig my fists into my temples. Sound familiar to anyone?  Oh and you have kids too?  Forget about it.  Worst mom ever.

Wow that was a lot of venting.  Moving on.

Here are 10 tips (or superstitions) that have worked for me:


1) Stay really hydrated.  I literally chug a glass of water about every hour.  Don’t believe me?  This is my water bottle, I mean 64 ounce jug.  I put my daughter’s 8 ounce cup on the side for comparison.  I don’t care how much you hate water.  That’s why I said chug.


2) Goodbye caffeine!  When I got pregnant with my first daughter 6 years ago, I gave up caffeine. If you really need coffee, switch to Decaf and just  let the flavor convince you that there’s a caffeine kick.  Otherwise, tea.  Decaf tea has worked for me… but make sure the tannins in tea are not your trigger.


3) And that is my husband’s wine collection… yup, goodbye alcohol.  Remember, do you want a migraine???  I’m sorry… but it’s the truth.  Alcohol is definitely a trigger…


As a side note, if your significant other is like mine and loves wine but now has no one to enjoy it with, you must get them a Coravin.  It is a device that allows you to pour out a portion of wine through a little needle without popping open the cork and the wine stays fresh.  Pretty innovative!


4) Uh oh.  I know you hate me now.  I hate this post too.  My weakness: chocolate… mmm chocolate.  I love chocolate chip cookies.  I love chocolate ice cream.  I love these chocolate covered caramel macadamia nuts.  $&@!  Everything comes in moderation and is a trial and error PER PERSON.  My solution is everyday I have a whey protein smoothie that uses natural chocolate flavors and it has worked to satisfy my craving without triggering my migraine!  Whew!


5) Aspartame: An artificial sweetener used in lots of drinks or foods is a trigger.  I used to love having Diet Coke everyday.  Or Barq’s root beer.  Reach for that glass of water instead.  Chug chug chug!!!

6) Eat regularly and eat natural foods more often than not.  Fresh vegetables, fresh fruits, basically the less processed the better.  Opposite of fresh food: hot dogs. Sausages.  Those also have nitrates which I know trigger my migraines.  Opposite of fresh food.  Ramen packages that I grew up on and crave, but also have MSG, another trigger.  Natural, fresh, I know where this came from and how it was made or what ingredients it has… and eat regularly, aka let your body have a little bit of nourishment throughout the day.


7) Sleep enough.  Like my girls.  Strict bedtimes.  Full night’s rest.  Ha!  Guilty guilty guilty.  I said I had some ideas for relief… but trust me it’s hard!!!  I went to Hawaii and slept in, took naps, felt great, and the first day I get back?  5 hours of sleep.  Went straight through teaching 3 intense classes in a row plus 4 loads of laundry, cleaning the house, cooking dinner, catching up on work, all while taking care of my 2 and 5 year olds who were cranky from the time change.  Slept 5 hours at the end of that day.  How can I not expect to get a Migraine?


8) Bodywork.  I knew I always loved deep tissue massages but now I know that regular bodywork actually helps prevent migraine attacks.  I carry so much stress (as most people do) in my neck and shoulders.  I used to get massages randomly as a special treat, but a year and a half ago, I started seeing my amazing friend Bill Vrabel at Marin Power Yoga regularly as a form of treatment.  And he’s not a “follow a sequence I was taught” type person.  I don’t have to say anything about where it is hurting and he can follow the energy lines in my body to know where I am tight on any particular day.  You need to find someone like that.  And see them regularly.  My home treatment?  Lying on random tennis balls or using this truMedic massager at home.  Better than nothing!


9) Medication.  I tried meds before and they never worked because I would always take the pills too late.  But I kept taking them in hopes of some magic.  I stopped meds when I became pregnant and was off meds for the past 5 years… and my migraines were worse than ever.  Just last year I was desperate and restarted Sumatriptan.  The difference is I know my body better now that I have had migraines for 25 years.  I know before the migraine is coming.  I know that cloudiness that begins to fog up my brain.  I know that general whole body unwell feeling and loss of appetite.  If you catch that moment BEFORE your migraine, the medicine is magic.  At least it has been for me… and I completely believe my yoga practice has been what has helped me distinguish a deeper level of mind and body awareness.  I am more in tune with my body when it starts to drift into migraine mode.  On to my final tip: #10.


10) Do you do too much?  Are you constantly thinking?  Are you running around like a headless chicken most of the day?  If so, you need some form of stress relief that lets your brain stop thinking.  I recommend yoga.  And just like bodywork, you have to find the yoga class and teacher and studio and community that resonates with you.  You’ll know if you take a class, and simply feel better afterwards.  That’s it.  You’ve found something good.

I started yoga 15 years ago in hopes of relieving my migraines.  But I still drank coffee, alcohol, didn’t watch what I ate, basically did not follow anything else on this list… so… yup still had chronic migraines.  But it’s the combination of all the above.  Maybe it’s because I am a mom now and have to take care of others… that I started to really notice what I needed to do to take care of myself.  You know, like how they say on an airplane to first put on your oxygen mask before your child’s?  All I know is I cannot live with migraines and I cannot take care of my kids when I get an attack.  I needed to find relief, so for the past year I have committed to this list above.  Not perfectly by all means, but *more often than not.*
And for the first year in 25 years, I had only FOUR migraines in 2016 compared to an average of TEN each year (of 24 years!!!) before.  This year, it is April 2017 and boy am I due for one… but *knock on wood,* I haven’t had one yet.  I must be doing something right.

And to me, that shows there is HOPE.  The only reason I wrote this post spontaneously is because for the very very very first time in my entire life, I found hope with my migraines, and I pray that you do too.  I feel you.  I understand you.  These steps are not fun nor easy, and they do absolutely take commitment, but I wish for your healing.  Please leave a comment if any of this has helped.

Love,

Grace

PS #11) Do NOT do no-handed headstands.  They are absolutely a trigger for me!!!  Bad Grace BAD!!!

Girls, Healthy Doesn’t Mean Skinny

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The truth is: my husband was disappointed when he found out we were having girls.  It sounds harsh, but the reason is because he knows all the problems and drama that girls are more-likely faced with these days, including especially body image issues that lead to anorexia or worse.  And as a father who dearly loves his daughters, it is an added worry and heartache in his life.  As a mom who completely understands these roller coaster emotions, binge eating habits, and struggles with self-esteem, I completely agree with my husband.  I am scared of all the peer pressure, media, and negative influences that are out there telling girls they are not pretty or skinny enough.  This is not OK.

I don’t usually forward articles, in fact, this is the first time I am sharing an article on my website.  However, my friend Jackie Ashton, who also teaches at Marin Power Yoga, published her powerful article, “Why This Mother Is Stopping It With the Cleanses, Diets,” on The Washington Post today and I feel drawn to share it.  Reading this article has brought more awareness into how my own actions may be creating positive or negative examples for my girls.  Teaching my girls healthy eating habits is one thing, but teaching them to love their body is another, much more important lesson.

“I am not my body. My body is an instrument that allows me to do great things in this life: to take care of my children, to be a loving friend, sister, daughter, and wife. In time, my body will decay and ultimately, it will die and dissolve into the ground. But what is inside—the true essence of who I am—will never change.” Jackie Ashton

I hope Jackie’s article speaks to you and all the women and daughters in your life.  Feel free to share your responses below!

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/parenting/wp/2016/03/31/why-this-mother-is-stopping-it-with-the-cleanses-diets/

“You Must Do The Thing Which You Think You Cannot Do.” ~ Eleanor Roosevelt

Marin Power Yoga

This past weekend I taught my Power Yoga class and began with 2 questions for my students to reflect on:

  1. What is something in your yoga practice that you have wanted to try or achieve, but you have been held back because of fear?  (For example, fear of falling, fear of not being strong enough, fear of getting out of your comfort zone, fear of embarrassment…)
  2. What is something in your personal life that you have wanted to change but fear has held you back?  (For example, changing jobs, saying no or yes more, apologizing to someone, fixing a bad habit…)

For myself, I also answered those same questions.  In my yoga classes, one area that I struggle with the most as an instructor is sharing about myself and letting students get to know my “story.” I hold back and usually stick to “textbook teaching” of cueing poses and alignment.  It is what I am comfortable doing.  Although teaching makes me seem like an extrovert because I stand in the front of a room full of people, I am truly an introvert and in all other areas of my life, I prefer to be hidden in the back corner of a room, keeping all my thoughts swirling around in my own head, silent to others.

Well, this weekend I decided to face my fear…

At the end of class, I shared about my hair.  My hair has been incredibly long since my teens, so around 25 years.  My hair is my security blanket.  I associate myself with Violet, from Pixar’s, “The Incredibles.”  Violet is the daughter of a superhero family and she uses her hair to hide behind so she won’t stand out. In fact, her superpower is becoming invisible, which is exactly how I relate to my hair – a symbol of something to hide behind!

The Incredibles "Violet"

As some of you know from my previous posts about migraines and attempts to heal my migraines, I have been suffering from migraines all my life and I am desperate for any chance of relief.  My latest theory is… maybe my 25 years of having long, THICK, hair, plus wearing them in high, heavy ponytails for most of that time during gymnastics, cheerleading, and now yoga/fitness classes, causes too much weight on my neck (my migraine pain seems to originate from my C1, where the base of my skull meets the top of the spine).

So in front of my students, (and facing my first challenge of sharing openly about myself…) I pulled out a pair of scissors (oh I wish I could have videotaped the giant gasps and “NOOO” cries in the room… haha!).  My husband and daughter came into the room and helped me to cut off my braid.  I went from shaking uncontrollably from nervousness and fear, to immediately feeling so refreshed and light!  It is just hair… but cutting my braid symbolized so much more.  I am facing my fears.  I am embracing change.  I am free!

Pantene Beautiful Lengths Haircut

I will be mailing my hair to Pantene Beautiful Lengths because someone out there with cancer needs my hair more than I do… sending all my love to everyone out there who has been or is fighting the biggest battle of their lives.  Stay strong and know you are loved!

Pantene Beautiful Lengths

You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face.  You must do the thing which you think you cannot do.

~ Eleanor Roosevelt

My Birthday Wish

I love birthdays because it always reminds me to stop and reflect on all the good in my life.  Two daughters that I can get endless hugs and kisses from.  A husband that supports our family by saving lives everyday.  A loyal dog that follows me everywhere I go.  New homeowners and surviving months of remodeling.  Flowers delivered from my best friend.  Friends and family sending hellos and birthday wishes.  A celebratory lemon drop martini.  Surviving our first family dinner out at a restaurant since my youngest was born 2 months ago.  Continuing a week-long dessert feast for my sweet tooth…

It’s easy to remember to cherish all the big and small blessings around me on my birthday, but the tricky part is slowing down the other 364 days of the year and not get too affected by the unimportant drama that can drag me down.  Being late to school.  Waiting in a long line at the grocery store.  Fighting exhausting.  Losing my patience.  Paying bills.  Organizing files.  Keeping the house clean.  Worrying about my weight.  Dealing with people that I disagree with.  The endless to-do list…

And then I read an email about my childhood family friend who I went to high school with.  Newly married, has a baby, normal life, and just diagnosed with Stage 4 Pancreatic Cancer.

What. Is. Going. On.

The answer?  Life.  This is life.  Temporary, unpredictable, cruel, and always too short.  As much as I try to control and plan ahead, life will take its own course.  I must accept that.  My friend has to accept that.

Everyday may not be my birthday, but beginning today, I will treat each day as if it were.  Because everyday deserves a little celebration, a little reflection, a little indulgence, and lots and lots of big hugs and kisses, regardless how out of control life seems.  Life is too short to look at the glass half empty.  It is always half full.

My birthday wish?  Stop and reflect on all the good in your life, right now.  Reach out to a long-lost friend and say hello.  Eat slower and savor each bite you chew.  Show your family you love them.  Filter out what is truly a big deal, and what is just drama that needs to be let go.  Tell stories and share with each other.  Let’s treat everyday like it is our birthday.

The Meaning of Easter Through Dance

What is the meaning of Easter?

To me, Easter is love, sacrifice, and hope.

It is a love that we receive regardless how many times we make mistakes, hurt others, or criticize ourselves.  It is a love that never leaves our side.  It is a love so deep that we were worth dying for.

It is a sacrifice that was unimaginable.  It is a sacrifice that was slow, painful, and absolutely horrific.  It is a sacrifice that led to death so that our lives would be saved.

It is a hope that tells us Jesus died for you and me, but miraculously rose from death 3 days later.  It is a hope that shows God has power over death and that death has been defeated.  It is a hope that through God’s unconditional love and Jesus’ sacrifice on the cross, we have been saved from eternal death and we have been given the promise of eternal life.

John 11:25-26, New International Version (NIV)

25 Jesus said to her, “I am the resurrection and the life. The one who believes in me will live, even though they die; 26 and whoever lives by believing in me will never die. Do you believe this?”

It took me about 25 years to believe.  I pray and hope that you will one day soon believe too.

Here is one of my favorite performances that is an interpretive hip hop dance about the story of Mary Magdalene and Jesus.  It begins with Mary Magdalene about to be stoned for adultery and Jesus stepping in to save her.  The dance represents Jesus’ love for all of us regardless of our sins, and continues to show His sacrifice on the cross and His resurrection.  This performance was at the Hawaiian Islands Ministry Conference in 2009 with my old hip hop dance ministry, Eight Count, and is choreographed to “Bleeding Love” by Leona Lewis.

 

 

 

 

The Grateful Habit

Grateful 365 Days a Year

“For each new morning with its light, For rest and shelter of the night.  For health and food, For love and friends, For everything Thy goodness sends.”

~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

Today I celebrate another birthday.  Yes, some things are different today.  I might hear from more people than a usual day.  I might receive a few more cards or gifts than a usual day.  I might eat a little unhealthier than a usual day.

But one thing that does not change from the other 364 days in the year… is feeling grateful.

We don’t need a special occasion or event to feel grateful.  We don’t need to receive anything or be acknowledged to feel grateful.  We don’t need to wait until we lose something or someone to feel grateful.

Being grateful is a skill to learn, a habit to form, a discipline to master.  It requires effort and it demands practice.  But when you put in that effort and when you truly practice being grateful, the way you see and experience the world will drastically change.

To be honest, on most days I am a nervous and anxious person who worries about everything and stresses out over the smallest things, causing me to be an insomniac, and is probably one of the triggers for my life-long migraines.  On other days, my naturally introverted personality likes to be self-critical and forces me so deep inside my head that I feel like I am bordering between moodiness and depression.  It is easy to be negative, to be pessimistic, to be angry.  Life is cruel to everyone in so many ways… but life can also be beautiful if you allow yourself to see the light in the darkness.

Three years ago, I received a gift from my sister – a five-year journal.  Each page had the date on the top, for example, March 10th, and underneath were 5 spaces for the journal entry, one for the current year, one for the following year, and so forth.  I chose to use this journal as a tangible method of forcing myself to see, really see, at least one positive thing that I was grateful for that day.  And so I began forming the habit of writing in my gratitude journal, and more importantly, forming “The Grateful Habit” of seeing the positive in negative, or simply ordinary, days.

Feeling grateful for not only the big things, but mostly the little things, is what transforms your attitude, your perspective, and your approach to life.  I am grateful for the rain because it makes my daughter so incredibly happy to jump in puddles when normally I would avoid being outside at all, I am grateful when I share a positive conversation in passing with someone I might normally not have talked to, I am grateful I was kept safe instead of being in a horrible accident that I witnessed, I am grateful for the barista that decided to give me a free drink for no reason, I am grateful for sitting here right now sharing my thoughts with all of you…

My birthday wish this year is for you to try it, at least for today, to reflect on your day so far and pinpoint one unique moment that made today different, a little better, a tiny bit more special.  What is something that made you smile, pleasantly surprised you, warmed your heart, helped you simply get through the day, or perhaps, made you laugh out loud today?

Today, I am grateful for YOU for taking the time to celebrate my birthday and reading my thoughts on this blog.  Thank you, I so appreciate you, and I hope you will be inspired to join “The Grateful Habit” in your own daily life.

Here are some of my favorite Grateful quotes that I would love to share with you:

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“Gratitude unlocks the fullness of life.  It turns what we have into enough, and more.  It turns denial into acceptance, chaos to order, confusion to clarity.  It can turn a meal into a feast, a house into a home, a stranger into a friend.  Gratitude makes sense of our past, brings peace for today, and creates a vision for tomorrow.”

~ Melody Beattie

*****

“Gratitude bestows reverence, allowing us to encounter everyday epiphanies, those transcendent moments of awe that change forever how we experience life and the world.”

~ John Milton

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“Whatever we are waiting for – peace of mind, contentment, grace, the inner awareness of simple abundance – it will surely come to us, but only when we are ready to receive it with an open and grateful heart.”

~ Sarah Ban Breathnach

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“The greatest contribution we can make to the well being of those in our lives is to have peace in our own hearts.  When our hearts are filled with gratitude and our minds are brimming with enthusiasm, everyone we encounter leaves our space feeling a little lighter than when they entered it.”

~ David Simon

*****

“Gratitude goes beyond the ‘mine’ and ‘thine’ and claims the truth that all of life is a pure gift.  In the past, I always thought of gratitude as a spontaneous response to the awareness of gifts received, but now I realize that gratitude can also be lived as a discipline.  The discipline of gratitude is the explicit effort to acknowledge that all I am and have is given to me as a gift of love, a gift to be celebrated with joy.”

~ Henri J. M. Nouwen